Mindfulness, Creativity, and Feminist Rhetorical Practices



Wednesday, November 13, 2013
2:15-3:45
500 Hall of Languages
Syracuse University

This talk answers the research question: What is the next stage in the development of my theory of rhetorical listening, a theory that I first proposed in my 1998 CCC article “Rhetorical Listening” and later extended in my 2005 book Rhetorical Listening: Identification, Gender, Whiteness. To answer this question, I will offer my own ideas as well as discuss the research of scholars who have employed rhetorical listening for a variety of ends. My own ideas include: discussing how rhetorical listening helps us to contemplate the question of how to create a civil civic discourse when different sides are not civil; discussing how cultural logics (i.e., ways of reasoning common to groups of people) may be defined syllogistically; and discussing how rhetorical listening presumes the existence of raced cultural spaces. Other scholars’ ideas include: using rhetorical listening for discussing issues, such as educational policy, composition pedagogy, feminist methodology, peacemaking, cross-cultural communication, and critical race studies’ projects, among others.

Krista Ratcliffe is Professor of English, Marquette University.

posted November 4, 2013

Mindfulness, Creativity, and Feminist Rhetorical Practices



Wednesday, October 30, 2013
2:15-3:45
500 Hall of Languages
Syracuse University

In this talk I argue that in order to deepen our engagement with public debates and to participate more fully in deliberative, democratic processes, we need to enhance our abilities to listen rhetorically, practice mindfulness, and foster creativity—processes that can be taught and learned but have been woefully neglected. Drawing on my recent work with Dr. Jacqueline Jones Royster, I explore how feminist rhetorical practices can foster deeper, more meaningful engagement in public discourse—as well as in our research and teaching. I illustrate my argument by drawing on several examples; I explore

  • how the notion of “strategic contemplation” can strengthen archival and historical research and enhance what we learn, see, notice, and understand, thereby allowing us to make more thoughtful, deliberate arguments about the past, the present, and the future;
  • how—and whether—strategic contemplation can come into play in the world of the digital humanities, as Jessica Enoch and Jean Bessette argue in their recent CCC article (June 2013);
  • how creativity and mindfulness play out in the world of business education, especially in an MBA program that seeks to integrate the arts and sciences throughout the curriculum in order to enhance students’ creativity, mindfulness, and cross-cultural perspectives.

I conclude by proposing that mindfulness, creativity, and feminist rhetorical practices are more closely intertwined than we might think and can support meaningful engagement in public debate as well as enhance ethically and culturally responsive writing.

Gesa E. Kirsch is Professor of English and Director of the Valente Center for Arts and Sciences, Bentley University.

posted October 2, 2013




Wednesday, October 2, 2013
2:15-3:45
500 Hall of Languages
Syracuse University

How is it that writers find their ways to new thoughts? From where does meaning arise? What is the phenomenological understanding of active listening? In this workshop, Sondra Perl will demonstrate a method for attending to what is not yet in words as way to engender new thinking.Based on the work of philosopher Eugene Gendlin, this method will lead to an exploration of the ways knowing is located in the body and how this bodily knowing can be used to guide writers not only as they face the blank page but also as they attend to their developing drafts.

Sondra Perl is Professor of English, Lehman College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

posted September 19, 2013

In an age filled with sound bytes and reductive arguments, listening—as teachers, researchers, and students—becomes a critical twenty-first-century literacy skill. This three-part interdisciplinary speaker series aims to recover listening in the study and teaching of writing across diverse fields and genres. From Sondra Perl’s exploration of active listening and felt sense to Gesa E. Kirsch’s examination of mindfulness and feminist rhetorical traditions to Krista Ratcliffe’s articulation of rhetorical listening, this series positions listening as an ethical imperative for writers and thinkers across the humanities. For a listing of speaker abstracts and titles, visit the calendar page at syracusehumanities.org.

Queries can be directed to Patrick W. Berry at pwberry@syr.edu or
315-443-1912.

                                                            

posted September 18, 2013

Preventing Plagiarism

Syracuse Symposium™ is organized and presented by the SU Humanities Center. Co-sponsors: The Writing Program; Departments of Women’s and Gender Studies, Communication and Rhetorical Studies, English, and Religion; Hendricks Chapel; Hendricks Chapel Wellness Fund; and the School of Education.

“Bird on a Wire” by Flickr user xomorrito, CC BY-SA 2.0